Wednesday, 29 August 2012

IT IS HARD WORK BEING THIS SHORT: 21.5-INCH TALL NEPALESE FARMER IS CONFIRMED AS THE WORLD'S SMALLEST MAN



A 72-year-old Nepalese man who made big claims to being the smallest man in the world has finally been confirmed as a record breaker.
A doctor and Guinness World Records official headed to Nepal to measure Chandra Bahadur Dangi to confirm his height of 21.5 inches (54.6 centimeters), shorter than the length of a broadsheet newspaper, where they declared him the world's shortest person.
On Sunday, Guinness presented Dangi with two certificates for being the world's shortest living man and the world's shortest person ever recorded in Guinness' 57-year history.

Dangi spends his days making placemats and head straps for villagers to carry heavy loads on their backs.
His nephew, Dolak Dangi, said: 'He would also look after the buffalos and cows.
'Although he could not chase them or tie them - he would call us if they strayed.'
Dangi hopes to use his new found fame to travel, admitting: 'I think things will be better now. I hope that I will be famous all over the world.
'I want to visit foreign countries and meet people from around the world.'
The cause of Mr Dangi's height problem has not been diagnosed but it is suspected that he suffers primordial dwarfism which begins in the womb.

Dangi, the seventh sibling of a family of six brothers and two sisters, does not remember his father and his mother, who died when he was 16-years-old. His immediate older brother and family have looked after him.
Three of his five brothers were less than four feet tall, while his two sisters and two brothers are of average height.
Dangi only left his village, Reemkholi in Dang district, about 217 miles from Kathmandu, for the first time five years ago and this is his first visit to the Himalayan capital.
Asked why he did not stake a claim earlier to be declared the shortest man, he said his family was unaware of such a record, because they are uneducated. Dangi spends his days making placemats and head straps for villagers to carry heavy loads on their backs.
His nephew, Dolak Dangi, said: 'He would also look after the buffalos and cows.
'Although he could not chase them or tie them - he would call us if they strayed.'
Dangi hopes to use his new found fame to travel, admitting: 'I think things will be better now. I hope that I will be famous all over the world.
'I want to visit foreign countries and meet people from around the world.'
The cause of Mr Dangi's height problem has not been diagnosed but it is suspected that he suffers primordial dwarfism which begins in the womb.

Dangi spends his days making placemats and head straps for villagers to carry heavy loads on their backs.
His nephew, Dolak Dangi, said: 'He would also look after the buffalos and cows.
'Although he could not chase them or tie them - he would call us if they strayed.'
Dangi hopes to use his new found fame to travel, admitting: 'I think things will be better now. I hope that I will be famous all over the world.
'I want to visit foreign countries and meet people from around the world.'
The cause of Mr Dangi's height problem has not been diagnosed but it is suspected that he suffers primordial dwarfism which begins in the womb.




                             

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